Changeset 86fc350


Ignore:
Timestamp:
Jul 20, 2021, 6:34:22 PM (3 years ago)
Author:
Peter A. Buhr <pabuhr@…>
Branches:
ADT, ast-experimental, enum, forall-pointer-decay, jacob/cs343-translation, master, new-ast-unique-expr, pthread-emulation, qualifiedEnum
Children:
6acd020, f9d8755
Parents:
d30804a (diff), 54651005 (diff)
Note: this is a merge changeset, the changes displayed below correspond to the merge itself.
Use the (diff) links above to see all the changes relative to each parent.
Message:

Merge branch 'master' of plg.uwaterloo.ca:software/cfa/cfa-cc

Files:
10 added
29 edited

Legend:

Unmodified
Added
Removed
  • doc/theses/andrew_beach_MMath/code/cond-catch.cfa

    rd30804a r86fc350  
    1919                throw_exception();
    2020        } catch (empty_exception * exc ; should_catch) {
    21                 // ...
     21                asm volatile ("# catch block (conditional)");
    2222        }
    2323}
     
    3737                        cond_catch();
    3838                } catch (empty_exception * exc) {
    39                         // ...
     39                        asm volatile ("# catch block (unconditional)");
    4040                }
    4141        }
  • doc/theses/andrew_beach_MMath/code/cond-catch.cpp

    rd30804a r86fc350  
    1919                throw_exception();
    2020        } catch (EmptyException & exc) {
    21                 if (should_catch) {
     21                if (!should_catch) {
    2222                        throw;
    2323                }
     24                asm volatile ("# catch block (conditional)");
    2425        }
    2526}
     
    3940                        cond_catch();
    4041                } catch (EmptyException &) {
    41                         // ...
     42                        asm volatile ("# catch block (unconditional)");
    4243                }
    4344    }
  • doc/theses/andrew_beach_MMath/code/cond-fixup.cfa

    rd30804a r86fc350  
    1212
    1313void throw_exception() {
    14         throw (empty_exception){&empty_vt};
     14        throwResume (empty_exception){&empty_vt};
    1515}
    1616
     
    1818        try {
    1919                throw_exception();
    20         } catch (empty_exception * exc ; should_catch) {
    21                 // ...
     20        } catchResume (empty_exception * exc ; should_catch) {
     21                asm volatile ("# fixup block (conditional)");
    2222        }
    2323}
     
    3636                try {
    3737                        cond_catch();
    38                 } catch (empty_exception * exc) {
    39                         // ...
     38                } catchResume (empty_exception * exc) {
     39                        asm volatile ("# fixup block (unconditional)");
    4040                }
    4141        }
  • doc/theses/andrew_beach_MMath/code/cross-catch.cfa

    rd30804a r86fc350  
    77EHM_EXCEPTION(not_raised_exception)();
    88
     9EHM_VIRTUAL_TABLE(not_raised_exception, not_vt);
     10
    911int main(int argc, char * argv[]) {
    1012        unsigned int times = 1;
    11         unsigned int total_frames = 1;
     13        bool should_throw = false;
    1214        if (1 < argc) {
    1315                times = strtol(argv[1], 0p, 10);
    14         }
    15         if (2 < argc) {
    16                 total_frames = strtol(argv[2], 0p, 10);
    1716        }
    1817
     
    2019        for (unsigned int count = 0 ; count < times ; ++count) {
    2120                try {
    22                         // ...
     21                        asm volatile ("# try block" : "=rm" (should_throw));
     22                        if (should_throw) {
     23                                throw (not_raised_exception){&not_vt};
     24                        }
    2325                } catch (not_raised_exception *) {
    24                         // ...
     26                        asm volatile ("# catch block");
    2527                }
    2628        }
  • doc/theses/andrew_beach_MMath/code/cross-catch.cpp

    rd30804a r86fc350  
    1111int main(int argc, char * argv[]) {
    1212        unsigned int times = 1;
     13        bool should_throw = false;
    1314        if (1 < argc) {
    1415                times = strtol(argv[1], nullptr, 10);
     
    1819        for (unsigned int count = 0 ; count < times ; ++count) {
    1920                try {
    20                         // ...
     21                        asm volatile ("# try block" : "=rm" (should_throw));
     22                        if (should_throw) {
     23                                throw NotRaisedException();
     24                        }
    2125                } catch (NotRaisedException &) {
    22                         // ...
     26                        asm volatile ("# catch block");
    2327                }
    2428        }
  • doc/theses/andrew_beach_MMath/code/cross-finally.cfa

    rd30804a r86fc350  
    55#include <stdlib.hfa>
    66
     7EHM_EXCEPTION(not_raised_exception)();
     8
     9EHM_VIRTUAL_TABLE(not_raised_exception, not_vt);
     10
    711int main(int argc, char * argv[]) {
    812        unsigned int times = 1;
    9         unsigned int total_frames = 1;
     13        bool should_throw = false;
    1014        if (1 < argc) {
    1115                times = strtol(argv[1], 0p, 10);
    12         }
    13         if (2 < argc) {
    14                 total_frames = strtol(argv[2], 0p, 10);
    1516        }
    1617
    1718        Time start_time = timeHiRes();
    1819        for (unsigned int count = 0 ; count < times ; ++count) {
    19                  try {
    20                         // ...
     20                try {
     21                        asm volatile ("# try block" : "=rm" (should_throw));
     22                        if (should_throw) {
     23                                throw (not_raised_exception){&not_vt};
     24                        }
    2125                } finally {
    22                         // ...
     26                        asm volatile ("# finally block");
    2327                }
    2428        }
  • doc/theses/andrew_beach_MMath/code/cross-resume.cfa

    rd30804a r86fc350  
    2020        for (unsigned int count = 0 ; count < times ; ++count) {
    2121                try {
    22                         // ...
     22                        asm volatile ("");
    2323                } catchResume (not_raised_exception *) {
    24                         // ...
     24                        asm volatile ("");
    2525                }
    2626        }
  • doc/theses/andrew_beach_MMath/code/resume-detor.cfa

    rd30804a r86fc350  
    1212
    1313void ^?{}(WithDestructor & this) {
    14     // ...
     14        asm volatile ("# destructor body");
    1515}
    1616
    1717void unwind_destructor(unsigned int frames) {
    18     if (frames) {
     18        if (frames) {
    1919
    20         WithDestructor object;
    21         unwind_destructor(frames - 1);
    22     } else {
    23         throwResume (empty_exception){&empty_vt};
    24     }
     20                WithDestructor object;
     21                unwind_destructor(frames - 1);
     22        } else {
     23                throwResume (empty_exception){&empty_vt};
     24        }
    2525}
    2626
     
    3636
    3737        Time start_time = timeHiRes();
    38     for (int count = 0 ; count < times ; ++count) {
    39         try {
    40             unwind_destructor(total_frames);
    41         } catchResume (empty_exception *) {
    42             // ...
    43         }
    44     }
     38        for (int count = 0 ; count < times ; ++count) {
     39                try {
     40                        unwind_destructor(total_frames);
     41                } catchResume (empty_exception *) {
     42                        asm volatile ("# fixup block");
     43                }
     44        }
    4545        Time end_time = timeHiRes();
    4646        sout | "Run-Time (ns): " | (end_time - start_time)`ns;
  • doc/theses/andrew_beach_MMath/code/resume-empty.cfa

    rd30804a r86fc350  
    1313                unwind_empty(frames - 1);
    1414        } else {
    15                 throw (empty_exception){&empty_vt};
     15                throwResume (empty_exception){&empty_vt};
    1616        }
    1717}
     
    3131                try {
    3232                        unwind_empty(total_frames);
    33                 } catch (empty_exception *) {
    34                         // ...
     33                } catchResume (empty_exception *) {
     34                        asm volatile ("# fixup block");
    3535                }
    3636        }
  • doc/theses/andrew_beach_MMath/code/resume-finally.cfa

    rd30804a r86fc350  
    1414                        unwind_finally(frames - 1);
    1515                } finally {
    16                         // ...
     16                        asm volatile ("# finally block");
    1717                }
    1818        } else {
     
    3636                        unwind_finally(total_frames);
    3737                } catchResume (empty_exception *) {
    38                         // ...
     38                        asm volatile ("# fixup block");
    3939                }
    4040        }
  • doc/theses/andrew_beach_MMath/code/resume-other.cfa

    rd30804a r86fc350  
    1616                        unwind_other(frames - 1);
    1717                } catchResume (not_raised_exception *) {
    18                         // ...
     18                        asm volatile ("# fixup block (stack)");
    1919                }
    2020        } else {
     
    3838                        unwind_other(total_frames);
    3939                } catchResume (empty_exception *) {
    40                         // ...
     40                        asm volatile ("# fixup block (base)");
    4141                }
    4242        }
  • doc/theses/andrew_beach_MMath/code/test.sh

    rd30804a r86fc350  
    1818        *.cfa)
    1919                # Requires a symbolic link.
    20                 mmake "${1%.cfa}" "$1" ./cfa "$1" -o "${1%.cfa}"
     20                mmake "${1%.cfa}" "$1" ./cfa -DNDEBUG -nodebug -O3 "$1" -o "${1%.cfa}"
    2121                ;;
    2222        *.cpp)
    23                 mmake "${1%.cpp}-cpp" "$1" g++ "$1" -o "${1%.cpp}-cpp"
     23                mmake "${1%.cpp}-cpp" "$1" g++ -DNDEBUG -O3 "$1" -o "${1%.cpp}-cpp"
    2424                ;;
    2525        *.java)
     
    3939        exit 0
    4040elif [ 2 -eq "$#" ]; then
    41     TEST_LANG="$1"
    42     TEST_CASE="$2"
     41        TEST_LANG="$1"
     42        TEST_CASE="$2"
    4343else
    44     echo "Unknown call pattern." >&2
    45     exit 2
     44        echo "Unknown call pattern." >&2
     45        exit 2
    4646fi
    4747
     
    5858        CPP="./cond-catch-cpp $ITERATIONS 1"
    5959        JAVA="java CondCatch $ITERATIONS 1"
     60        PYTHON="./cond_catch.py $ITERATIONS 1"
    6061        ;;
    6162cond-match-none)
     
    6465        CPP="./cond-catch-cpp $ITERATIONS 0"
    6566        JAVA="java CondCatch $ITERATIONS 0"
     67        PYTHON="./cond_catch.py $ITERATIONS 0"
    6668        ;;
    6769cross-catch)
     
    7072        CPP="./cross-catch-cpp $ITERATIONS"
    7173        JAVA="java CrossCatch $ITERATIONS"
     74        PYTHON="./cross_catch.py $ITERATIONS"
    7275        ;;
    7376cross-finally)
     
    7679        CPP=unsupported
    7780        JAVA="java CrossFinally $ITERATIONS"
     81        PYTHON="./cross_finally.py $ITERATIONS"
    7882        ;;
    7983raise-detor)
     
    8286        CPP="./throw-detor-cpp $ITERATIONS $STACK_HEIGHT"
    8387        JAVA=unsupported
     88        PYTHON=unsupported
    8489        ;;
    8590raise-empty)
     
    8893        CPP="./throw-empty-cpp $ITERATIONS $STACK_HEIGHT"
    8994        JAVA="java ThrowEmpty $ITERATIONS $STACK_HEIGHT"
     95        PYTHON="./throw_empty.py $ITERATIONS $STACK_HEIGHT"
    9096        ;;
    9197raise-finally)
     
    94100        CPP=unsupported
    95101        JAVA="java ThrowFinally $ITERATIONS $STACK_HEIGHT"
     102        PYTHON="./throw_finally.py $ITERATIONS $STACK_HEIGHT"
    96103        ;;
    97104raise-other)
     
    100107        CPP="./throw-other-cpp $ITERATIONS $STACK_HEIGHT"
    101108        JAVA="java ThrowOther $ITERATIONS $STACK_HEIGHT"
     109        PYTHON="./throw_other.py $ITERATIONS $STACK_HEIGHT"
    102110        ;;
    103111*)
     
    112120cpp) echo $CPP; $CPP;;
    113121java) echo $JAVA; $JAVA;;
     122python) echo $PYTHON; $PYTHON;;
    114123*)
    115124        echo "No such language: $TEST_LANG" >&2
    116125        exit 2
     126        ;;
    117127esac
  • doc/theses/andrew_beach_MMath/code/throw-detor.cfa

    rd30804a r86fc350  
    1212
    1313void ^?{}(WithDestructor & this) {
    14         // ...
     14        asm volatile ("# destructor body");
    1515}
    1616
     
    3939                        unwind_destructor(total_frames);
    4040                } catch (empty_exception *) {
    41                         // ...
     41                        asm volatile ("# catch block");
    4242                }
    4343        }
  • doc/theses/andrew_beach_MMath/code/throw-detor.cpp

    rd30804a r86fc350  
    1010
    1111struct WithDestructor {
    12         ~WithDestructor() {}
     12        ~WithDestructor() {
     13                asm volatile ("# destructor body");
     14        }
    1315};
    1416
     
    3739                        unwind_destructor(total_frames);
    3840                } catch (EmptyException &) {
    39                         // ...
     41                        asm volatile ("# catch block");
    4042                }
    4143        }
  • doc/theses/andrew_beach_MMath/code/throw-empty.cfa

    rd30804a r86fc350  
    3232                        unwind_empty(total_frames);
    3333                } catch (empty_exception *) {
    34                         // ...
     34                        asm volatile ("# catch block");
    3535                }
    3636        }
  • doc/theses/andrew_beach_MMath/code/throw-empty.cpp

    rd30804a r86fc350  
    3232                        unwind_empty(total_frames);
    3333                } catch (EmptyException &) {
    34                         // ...
     34                        asm volatile ("# catch block");
    3535                }
    3636        }
  • doc/theses/andrew_beach_MMath/code/throw-finally.cfa

    rd30804a r86fc350  
    1414                        unwind_finally(frames - 1);
    1515                } finally {
    16                         // ...
     16                        asm volatile ("# finally block");
    1717                }
    1818        } else {
     
    3636                        unwind_finally(total_frames);
    3737                } catch (empty_exception *) {
    38                         // ...
     38                        asm volatile ("# catch block");
    3939                }
    4040        }
  • doc/theses/andrew_beach_MMath/code/throw-other.cfa

    rd30804a r86fc350  
    1616                        unwind_other(frames - 1);
    1717                } catch (not_raised_exception *) {
    18                         // ...
     18                        asm volatile ("# catch block (stack)");
    1919                }
    2020        } else {
     
    3838                        unwind_other(total_frames);
    3939                } catch (empty_exception *) {
    40                         // ...
     40                        asm volatile ("# catch block (base)");
    4141                }
    4242        }
  • doc/theses/andrew_beach_MMath/code/throw-other.cpp

    rd30804a r86fc350  
    1616                        unwind_other(frames - 1);
    1717                } catch (NotRaisedException &) {
    18                         // ...
     18                        asm volatile ("# catch block (stack)");
    1919                }
    2020        } else {
     
    3838                        unwind_other(total_frames);
    3939                } catch (EmptyException &) {
    40                         // ...
     40                        asm volatile ("# catch block (base)");
    4141                }
    4242        }
  • doc/theses/andrew_beach_MMath/intro.tex

    rd30804a r86fc350  
    107107
    108108Exception handling is not a new concept,
    109 with papers on the subject dating back 70s.
    110 
    111 Their were popularised by \Cpp,
     109with papers on the subject dating back 70s.\cite{Goodenough}
     110
     111Early exceptions were often treated as signals. They carried no information
     112except their identity. Ada still uses this system.
     113
     114The modern flag-ship for termination exceptions is \Cpp,
    112115which added them in its first major wave of non-object-orientated features
    113116in 1990.
    114117% https://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/language/history
    115 
    116 Java was the next popular language to use exceptions. It is also the most
    117 popular language with checked exceptions.
     118\Cpp has the ability to use any value of any type as an exception.
     119However that seems to immediately pushed aside for classes inherited from
     120\code{C++}{std::exception}.
     121Although there is a special catch-all syntax it does not allow anything to
     122be done with the caught value becuase nothing is known about it.
     123So instead a base type is defined with some common functionality (such as
     124the ability to describe the reason the exception was raised) and all
     125exceptions have that functionality.
     126This seems to be the standard now, as the garentied functionality is worth
     127any lost flexibility from limiting it to a single type.
     128
     129Java was the next popular language to use exceptions.
     130Its exception system largely reflects that of \Cpp, except that requires
     131you throw a child type of \code{Java}{java.lang.Throwable}
     132and it uses checked exceptions.
    118133Checked exceptions are part of the function interface they are raised from.
    119134This includes functions they propogate through, until a handler for that
     
    131146Resumption exceptions have been much less popular.
    132147Although resumption has a history as old as termination's, very few
    133 programming languages have implement them.
     148programming languages have implemented them.
    134149% http://bitsavers.informatik.uni-stuttgart.de/pdf/xerox/parc/techReports/
    135150%   CSL-79-3_Mesa_Language_Manual_Version_5.0.pdf
    136 Mesa is one programming languages that did and experiance with that
    137 languages is quoted as being one of the reasons resumptions were not
     151Mesa is one programming languages that did. Experiance with Mesa
     152is quoted as being one of the reasons resumptions were not
    138153included in the \Cpp standard.
    139154% https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exception_handling
    140 \todo{A comment about why we did include them when they are so unpopular
    141 might be approprate.}
    142 
    143 %\subsection
    144 Functional languages, tend to use solutions like the return union, but some
    145 exception-like constructs still appear.
    146 
    147 For instance Haskell's built in error mechanism can make the result of any
    148 expression, including function calls. Any expression that examines an
    149 error value will in-turn produce an error. This continues until the main
    150 function produces an error or until it is handled by one of the catch
    151 functions.
     155Since then resumptions have been ignored in the main-stream.
     156
     157All of this does call into question the use of resumptions, is
     158something largely rejected decades ago worth revisiting now?
     159Yes, even if it was the right call at the time there have been decades
     160of other developments in computer science that have changed the situation
     161since then.
     162Some of these developments, such as in functional programming's resumption
     163equivalent: algebraic effects\cite{Zhang19}, are directly related to
     164resumptions as well.
     165A complete rexamination of resumptions is beyond a single paper, but it is
     166enough to try them again in \CFA.
     167% Especially considering how much easier they are to implement than
     168% termination exceptions.
     169
     170%\subsection
     171Functional languages tend to use other solutions for their primary error
     172handling mechanism, exception-like constructs still appear.
     173Termination appears in error construct, which marks the result of an
     174expression as an error, the result of any expression that tries to use it as
     175an error, and so on until an approprate handler is reached.
     176Resumption appears in algebric effects, where a function dispatches its
     177side-effects to its caller for handling.
    152178
    153179%\subsection
    154180More recently exceptions seem to be vanishing from newer programming
    155 languages.
    156 Rust and Go reduce this feature to panics.
    157 Panicing is somewhere between a termination exception and a program abort.
    158 Notably in Rust a panic can trigger either, a panic may unwind the stack or
    159 simply kill the process.
     181languages, replaced by ``panic".
     182In Rust a panic is just a program level abort that may be implemented by
     183unwinding the stack like in termination exception handling.
    160184% https://doc.rust-lang.org/std/panic/fn.catch_unwind.html
    161 Go's panic is much more similar to a termination exception but there is
    162 only a catch-all function with \code{Go}{recover()}.
    163 So exceptions still are appearing, just in reduced forms.
     185Go's panic through is very similar to a termination except it only supports
     186a catch-all by calling \code{Go}{recover()}, simplifying the interface at
     187the cost of flexability.
    164188
    165189%\subsection
  • doc/theses/mubeen_zulfiqar_MMath/allocator.tex

    rd30804a r86fc350  
    111111%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
    112112
    113 \section{Added Features}
    114 
    115 
    116 \subsection{Methods}
    117 Why did we need it?
    118 The added benefits.
    119 
     113\section{Added Features and Methods}
     114To improve the UHeapLmmm allocator (FIX ME: cite uHeapLmmm) interface and make it more user friendly, we added a few more routines to the C allocator. Also, we built a CFA (FIX ME: cite cforall) interface on top of C interface to increase the usability of the allocator.
     115
     116\subsection{C Interface}
     117We added a few more features and routines to the allocator's C interface that can make the allocator more usable to the programmers. THese features will programmer more control on the dynamic memory allocation.
     118
     119\subsubsection void * aalloc( size_t dim, size_t elemSize )
     120aalloc is an extension of malloc. It allows programmer to allocate a dynamic array of objects without calculating the total size of array explicitly. The only alternate of this routine in the other allocators is calloc but calloc also fills the dynamic memory with 0 which makes it slower for a programmer who only wants to dynamically allocate an array of objects without filling it with 0.
     121\paragraph{Usage}
     122aalloc takes two parameters.
     123\begin{itemize}
     124\item
     125dim: number of objects in the array
     126\item
     127elemSize: size of the object in the array.
     128\end{itemize}
     129It returns address of dynamic object allocatoed on heap that can contain dim number of objects of the size elemSize. On failure, it returns NULL pointer.
     130
     131\subsubsection void * resize( void * oaddr, size_t size )
     132resize is an extension of relloc. It allows programmer to reuse a cuurently allocated dynamic object with a new size requirement. Its alternate in the other allocators is realloc but relloc also copy the data in old object to the new object which makes it slower for the programmer who only wants to reuse an old dynamic object for a new size requirement but does not want to preserve the data in the old object to the new object.
     133\paragraph{Usage}
     134resize takes two parameters.
     135\begin{itemize}
     136\item
     137oaddr: the address of the old object that needs to be resized.
     138\item
     139size: the new size requirement of the to which the old object needs to be resized.
     140\end{itemize}
     141It returns an object that is of the size given but it does not preserve the data in the old object. On failure, it returns NULL pointer.
     142
     143\subsubsection void * resize( void * oaddr, size_t nalign, size_t size )
     144This resize is an extension of the above resize (FIX ME: cite above resize). In addition to resizing the size of of an old object, it can also realign the old object to a new alignment requirement.
     145\paragraph{Usage}
     146This resize takes three parameters. It takes an additional parameter of nalign as compared to the above resize (FIX ME: cite above resize).
     147\begin{itemize}
     148\item
     149oaddr: the address of the old object that needs to be resized.
     150\item
     151nalign: the new alignment to which the old object needs to be realigned.
     152\item
     153size: the new size requirement of the to which the old object needs to be resized.
     154\end{itemize}
     155It returns an object with the size and alignment given in the parameters. On failure, it returns a NULL pointer.
     156
     157\subsubsection void * amemalign( size_t alignment, size_t dim, size_t elemSize )
     158amemalign is a hybrid of memalign and aalloc. It allows programmer to allocate an aligned dynamic array of objects without calculating the total size of the array explicitly. It frees the programmer from calculating the total size of the array.
     159\paragraph{Usage}
     160amemalign takes three parameters.
     161\begin{itemize}
     162\item
     163alignment: the alignment to which the dynamic array needs to be aligned.
     164\item
     165dim: number of objects in the array
     166\item
     167elemSize: size of the object in the array.
     168\end{itemize}
     169It returns a dynamic array of objects that has the capacity to contain dim number of objects of the size of elemSize. The returned dynamic array is aligned to the given alignment. On failure, it returns NULL pointer.
     170
     171\subsubsection void * cmemalign( size_t alignment, size_t dim, size_t elemSize )
     172cmemalign is a hybrid of amemalign and calloc. It allows programmer to allocate an aligned dynamic array of objects that is 0 filled. The current way to do this in other allocators is to allocate an aligned object with memalign and then fill it with 0 explicitly. This routine provides both features of aligning and 0 filling, implicitly.
     173\paragraph{Usage}
     174cmemalign takes three parameters.
     175\begin{itemize}
     176\item
     177alignment: the alignment to which the dynamic array needs to be aligned.
     178\item
     179dim: number of objects in the array
     180\item
     181elemSize: size of the object in the array.
     182\end{itemize}
     183It returns a dynamic array of objects that has the capacity to contain dim number of objects of the size of elemSize. The returned dynamic array is aligned to the given alignment and is 0 filled. On failure, it returns NULL pointer.
     184
     185\subsubsection size_t malloc_alignment( void * addr )
     186malloc_alignment returns the alignment of a currently allocated dynamic object. It allows the programmer in memory management and personal bookkeeping. It helps the programmer in verofying the alignment of a dynamic object especially in a scenerio similar to prudcer-consumer where a producer allocates a dynamic object and the consumer needs to assure that the dynamic object was allocated with the required alignment.
     187\paragraph{Usage}
     188malloc_alignment takes one parameters.
     189\begin{itemize}
     190\item
     191addr: the address of the currently allocated dynamic object.
     192\end{itemize}
     193malloc_alignment returns the alignment of the given dynamic object. On failure, it return the value of default alignment of the uHeapLmmm allocator.
     194
     195\subsubsection bool malloc_zero_fill( void * addr )
     196malloc_zero_fill returns whether a currently allocated dynamic object was initially zero filled at the time of allocation. It allows the programmer in memory management and personal bookkeeping. It helps the programmer in verifying the zero filled property of a dynamic object especially in a scenerio similar to prudcer-consumer where a producer allocates a dynamic object and the consumer needs to assure that the dynamic object was zero filled at the time of allocation.
     197\paragraph{Usage}
     198malloc_zero_fill takes one parameters.
     199\begin{itemize}
     200\item
     201addr: the address of the currently allocated dynamic object.
     202\end{itemize}
     203malloc_zero_fill returns true if the dynamic object was initially zero filled and return false otherwise. On failure, it returns false.
     204
     205\subsubsection size_t malloc_size( void * addr )
     206malloc_size returns the allocation size of a currently allocated dynamic object. It allows the programmer in memory management and personal bookkeeping. It helps the programmer in verofying the alignment of a dynamic object especially in a scenerio similar to prudcer-consumer where a producer allocates a dynamic object and the consumer needs to assure that the dynamic object was allocated with the required size. Its current alternate in the other allocators is malloc_usable_size. But, malloc_size is different from malloc_usable_size as malloc_usabe_size returns the total data capacity of dynamic object including the extra space at the end of the dynamic object. On the other hand, malloc_size returns the size that was given to the allocator at the allocation of the dynamic object. This size is updated when an object is realloced, resized, or passed through a similar allocator routine.
     207\paragraph{Usage}
     208malloc_size takes one parameters.
     209\begin{itemize}
     210\item
     211addr: the address of the currently allocated dynamic object.
     212\end{itemize}
     213malloc_size returns the allocation size of the given dynamic object. On failure, it return zero.
     214
     215\subsubsection void * realloc( void * oaddr, size_t nalign, size_t size )
     216This realloc is an extension of the default realloc (FIX ME: cite default realloc). In addition to reallocating an old object and preserving the data in old object, it can also realign the old object to a new alignment requirement.
     217\paragraph{Usage}
     218This realloc takes three parameters. It takes an additional parameter of nalign as compared to the default realloc.
     219\begin{itemize}
     220\item
     221oaddr: the address of the old object that needs to be reallocated.
     222\item
     223nalign: the new alignment to which the old object needs to be realigned.
     224\item
     225size: the new size requirement of the to which the old object needs to be resized.
     226\end{itemize}
     227It returns an object with the size and alignment given in the parameters that preserves the data in the old object. On failure, it returns a NULL pointer.
     228
     229\subsection{CFA Malloc Interface}
     230We added some routines to the malloc interface of CFA. These routines can only be used in CFA and not in our standalone uHeapLmmm allocator as these routines use some features that are only provided by CFA and not by C. It makes the allocator even more usable to the programmers.
     231CFA provides the liberty to know the returned type of a call to the allocator. So, mainly in these added routines, we removed the object size parameter from the routine as allocator can calculate the size of the object from the returned type.
     232
     233\subsubsection T * malloc( void )
     234This malloc is a simplified polymorphic form of defualt malloc (FIX ME: cite malloc). It does not take any parameter as compared to default malloc that takes one parameter.
     235\paragraph{Usage}
     236This malloc takes no parameters.
     237It returns a dynamic object of the size of type T. On failure, it return NULL pointer.
     238
     239\subsubsection T * aalloc( size_t dim )
     240This aalloc is a simplified polymorphic form of above aalloc (FIX ME: cite aalloc). It takes one parameter as compared to the above aalloc that takes two parameters.
     241\paragraph{Usage}
     242aalloc takes one parameters.
     243\begin{itemize}
     244\item
     245dim: required number of objects in the array.
     246\end{itemize}
     247It returns a dynamic object that has the capacity to contain dim number of objects, each of the size of type T. On failure, it return NULL pointer.
     248
     249\subsubsection T * calloc( size_t dim )
     250This calloc is a simplified polymorphic form of defualt calloc (FIX ME: cite calloc). It takes one parameter as compared to the default calloc that takes two parameters.
     251\paragraph{Usage}
     252This calloc takes one parameter.
     253\begin{itemize}
     254\item
     255dim: required number of objects in the array.
     256\end{itemize}
     257It returns a dynamic object that has the capacity to contain dim number of objects, each of the size of type T. On failure, it return NULL pointer.
     258
     259\subsubsection T * resize( T * ptr, size_t size )
     260This resize is a simplified polymorphic form of above resize (FIX ME: cite resize with alignment). It takes two parameters as compared to the above resize that takes three parameters. It frees the programmer from explicitly mentioning the alignment of the allocation as CFA provides gives allocator the liberty to get the alignment of the returned type.
     261\paragraph{Usage}
     262This resize takes two parameters.
     263\begin{itemize}
     264\item
     265ptr: address of the old object.
     266\item
     267size: the required size of the new object.
     268\end{itemize}
     269It returns a dynamic object of the size given in paramters. The returned object is aligned to the alignemtn of type T. On failure, it return NULL pointer.
     270
     271\subsubsection T * realloc( T * ptr, size_t size )
     272This realloc is a simplified polymorphic form of defualt realloc (FIX ME: cite realloc with align). It takes two parameters as compared to the above realloc that takes three parameters. It frees the programmer from explicitly mentioning the alignment of the allocation as CFA provides gives allocator the liberty to get the alignment of the returned type.
     273\paragraph{Usage}
     274This realloc takes two parameters.
     275\begin{itemize}
     276\item
     277ptr: address of the old object.
     278\item
     279size: the required size of the new object.
     280\end{itemize}
     281It returns a dynamic object of the size given in paramters that preserves the data in the given object. The returned object is aligned to the alignemtn of type T. On failure, it return NULL pointer.
     282
     283\subsubsection T * memalign( size_t align )
     284This memalign is a simplified polymorphic form of defualt memalign (FIX ME: cite memalign). It takes one parameters as compared to the default memalign that takes two parameters.
     285\paragraph{Usage}
     286memalign takes one parameters.
     287\begin{itemize}
     288\item
     289align: the required alignment of the dynamic object.
     290\end{itemize}
     291It returns a dynamic object of the size of type T that is aligned to given parameter align. On failure, it return NULL pointer.
     292
     293\subsubsection T * amemalign( size_t align, size_t dim )
     294This amemalign is a simplified polymorphic form of above amemalign (FIX ME: cite amemalign). It takes two parameter as compared to the above amemalign that takes three parameters.
     295\paragraph{Usage}
     296amemalign takes two parameters.
     297\begin{itemize}
     298\item
     299align: required alignment of the dynamic array.
     300\item
     301dim: required number of objects in the array.
     302\end{itemize}
     303It returns a dynamic object that has the capacity to contain dim number of objects, each of the size of type T. The returned object is aligned to the given parameter align. On failure, it return NULL pointer.
     304
     305\subsubsection T * cmemalign( size_t align, size_t dim  )
     306This cmemalign is a simplified polymorphic form of above cmemalign (FIX ME: cite cmemalign). It takes two parameter as compared to the above cmemalign that takes three parameters.
     307\paragraph{Usage}
     308cmemalign takes two parameters.
     309\begin{itemize}
     310\item
     311align: required alignment of the dynamic array.
     312\item
     313dim: required number of objects in the array.
     314\end{itemize}
     315It returns a dynamic object that has the capacity to contain dim number of objects, each of the size of type T. The returned object is aligned to the given parameter align and is zero filled. On failure, it return NULL pointer.
     316
     317\subsubsection T * aligned_alloc( size_t align )
     318This aligned_alloc is a simplified polymorphic form of defualt aligned_alloc (FIX ME: cite aligned_alloc). It takes one parameter as compared to the default aligned_alloc that takes two parameters.
     319\paragraph{Usage}
     320This aligned_alloc takes one parameter.
     321\begin{itemize}
     322\item
     323align: required alignment of the dynamic object.
     324\end{itemize}
     325It returns a dynamic object of the size of type T that is aligned to the given parameter. On failure, it return NULL pointer.
     326
     327\subsubsection int posix_memalign( T ** ptr, size_t align )
     328This posix_memalign is a simplified polymorphic form of defualt posix_memalign (FIX ME: cite posix_memalign). It takes two parameters as compared to the default posix_memalign that takes three parameters.
     329\paragraph{Usage}
     330This posix_memalign takes two parameter.
     331\begin{itemize}
     332\item
     333ptr: variable address to store the address of the allocated object.
     334\item
     335align: required alignment of the dynamic object.
     336\end{itemize}
     337It stores address of the dynamic object of the size of type T in given parameter ptr. This object is aligned to the given parameter. On failure, it return NULL pointer.
     338
     339\subsubsection T * valloc( void )
     340This valloc is a simplified polymorphic form of defualt valloc (FIX ME: cite valloc). It takes no parameters as compared to the default valloc that takes one parameter.
     341\paragraph{Usage}
     342valloc takes no parameters.
     343It returns a dynamic object of the size of type T that is aligned to the page size. On failure, it return NULL pointer.
     344
     345\subsubsection T * pvalloc( void )
     346This pcvalloc is a simplified polymorphic form of defualt pcvalloc (FIX ME: cite pcvalloc). It takes no parameters as compared to the default pcvalloc that takes one parameter.
     347\paragraph{Usage}
     348pvalloc takes no parameters.
     349It returns a dynamic object of the size that is calcutaed by rouding the size of type T. The returned object is also aligned to the page size. On failure, it return NULL pointer.
    120350
    121351\subsection{Alloc Interface}
  • libcfa/src/concurrency/locks.cfa

    rd30804a r86fc350  
    120120        owner = t;
    121121        recursion_count = ( t ? 1 : 0 );
    122         wait_count--;
     122        if ( t ) wait_count--;
    123123        unpark( t );
    124124}
  • src/CompilationState.cc

    rd30804a r86fc350  
    99// Author           : Rob Schluntz
    1010// Created On       : Mon Ju1 30 10:47:01 2018
    11 // Last Modified By : Peter A. Buhr
    12 // Last Modified On : Fri May  3 13:45:23 2019
    13 // Update Count     : 4
     11// Last Modified By : Henry Xue
     12// Last Modified On : Tue Jul 20 04:27:35 2021
     13// Update Count     : 5
    1414//
    1515
     
    2323        ctorinitp = false,
    2424        declstatsp = false,
     25        exdeclp = false,
    2526        exprp = false,
    2627        expraltp = false,
  • src/CompilationState.h

    rd30804a r86fc350  
    99// Author           : Rob Schluntz
    1010// Created On       : Mon Ju1 30 10:47:01 2018
    11 // Last Modified By : Peter A. Buhr
    12 // Last Modified On : Fri May  3 13:43:21 2019
    13 // Update Count     : 4
     11// Last Modified By : Henry Xue
     12// Last Modified On : Tue Jul 20 04:27:35 2021
     13// Update Count     : 5
    1414//
    1515
     
    2222        ctorinitp,
    2323        declstatsp,
     24        exdeclp,
    2425        exprp,
    2526        expraltp,
  • src/ControlStruct/module.mk

    rd30804a r86fc350  
    1010## Author           : Richard C. Bilson
    1111## Created On       : Mon Jun  1 17:49:17 2015
    12 ## Last Modified By : Andrew Beach
    13 ## Last Modified On : Wed Jun 28 16:15:00 2017
    14 ## Update Count     : 4
     12## Last Modified By : Henry Xue
     13## Last Modified On : Tue Jul 20 04:10:50 2021
     14## Update Count     : 5
    1515###############################################################################
    1616
    1717SRC_CONTROLSTRUCT = \
     18        ControlStruct/ExceptDecl.cc \
     19        ControlStruct/ExceptDecl.h \
    1820        ControlStruct/ForExprMutator.cc \
    1921        ControlStruct/ForExprMutator.h \
  • src/Parser/TypeData.cc

    rd30804a r86fc350  
    99// Author           : Rodolfo G. Esteves
    1010// Created On       : Sat May 16 15:12:51 2015
    11 // Last Modified By : Peter A. Buhr
    12 // Last Modified On : Wed Jul 14 18:57:31 2021
    13 // Update Count     : 672
     11// Last Modified By : Henry Xue
     12// Last Modified On : Tue Jul 20 04:10:50 2021
     13// Update Count     : 673
    1414//
    1515
     
    778778          case AggregateDecl::Struct:
    779779          case AggregateDecl::Coroutine:
     780          case AggregateDecl::Exception:
    780781          case AggregateDecl::Generator:
    781782          case AggregateDecl::Monitor:
  • src/SynTree/Declaration.h

    rd30804a r86fc350  
    99// Author           : Richard C. Bilson
    1010// Created On       : Mon May 18 07:44:20 2015
    11 // Last Modified By : Peter A. Buhr
    12 // Last Modified On : Fri Mar 12 18:35:36 2021
    13 // Update Count     : 159
     11// Last Modified By : Henry Xue
     12// Last Modified On : Tue Jul 20 04:10:50 2021
     13// Update Count     : 160
    1414//
    1515
     
    300300
    301301        bool is_coroutine() { return kind == Coroutine; }
     302        bool is_exception() { return kind == Exception; }
    302303        bool is_generator() { return kind == Generator; }
    303304        bool is_monitor  () { return kind == Monitor  ; }
  • src/main.cc

    rd30804a r86fc350  
    99// Author           : Peter Buhr and Rob Schluntz
    1010// Created On       : Fri May 15 23:12:02 2015
    11 // Last Modified By : Peter A. Buhr
    12 // Last Modified On : Sat Mar  6 15:49:00 2021
    13 // Update Count     : 656
     11// Last Modified By : Henry Xue
     12// Last Modified On : Tue Jul 20 04:27:35 2021
     13// Update Count     : 658
    1414//
    1515
     
    4949#include "Common/utility.h"                 // for deleteAll, filter, printAll
    5050#include "Concurrency/Waitfor.h"            // for generateWaitfor
     51#include "ControlStruct/ExceptDecl.h"       // for translateExcept
    5152#include "ControlStruct/ExceptTranslate.h"  // for translateEHM
    5253#include "ControlStruct/Mutate.h"           // for mutate
     
    305306                CodeTools::fillLocations( translationUnit );
    306307                Stats::Time::StopBlock();
     308
     309                PASS( "Translate Exception Declarations", ControlStruct::translateExcept( translationUnit ) );
     310                if ( exdeclp ) {
     311                        dump( translationUnit );
     312                        return EXIT_SUCCESS;
     313                } // if
    307314
    308315                // add the assignment statement after the initialization of a type parameter
     
    549556        // code dumps
    550557        { "ast", astp, true, "print AST after parsing" },
     558        { "exdecl", exdeclp, true, "print AST after translating exception decls" },
    551559        { "symevt", symtabp, true, "print AST after symbol table events" },
    552560        { "altexpr", expraltp, true, "print alternatives for expressions" },
  • tests/polymorphism.cfa

    rd30804a r86fc350  
    7171                printf("  offset of inner float:  %ld\n", ((char *) & x_inner_float ) - ((char *) & x) );
    7272
    73         void showStatic( thing(int) & x ) {
     73        void showStatic( thing(long long int) & x ) {
    7474                printf("static:\n");
    7575                SHOW_OFFSETS
     
    8585
    8686        printf("=== checkPlan9offsets\n");
    87         thing(int) x;
     87        thing(long long int) x;
    8888        showStatic(x);
    8989        showDynamic(x);
Note: See TracChangeset for help on using the changeset viewer.