Changeset 2d63023 for doc/theses


Ignore:
Timestamp:
Jan 15, 2021, 3:01:11 PM (9 months ago)
Author:
Fangren Yu <f37yu@…>
Branches:
arm-eh, jacob/cs343-translation, master, new-ast-unique-expr
Children:
d46bdac
Parents:
b8b0de0c
Message:

add abstract and introduction section

File:
1 edited

Legend:

Unmodified
Added
Removed
  • doc/theses/fangren_yu_COOP_F20/Report.tex

    rb8b0de0c r2d63023  
    8787
    8888\begin{abstract}
     89
     90\CFA is an evolutionary extension to the C programming language, featuring a parametric type system, and is currently under active development. The reference compiler for \CFA language, @cfa-cc@, has some of its major components dated back to early 2000s, and is based on inefficient data structures and algorithms. Some improvements targeting the expression resolution algorithm, suggested by a recent prototype experiment on a simplified model, are implemented in @cfa-cc@ to support the full \CFA language. These optimizations speed up the compiler significantly by a factor of 20 across the existing \CFA codebase, bringing the compilation time of a mid-sized \CFA source file down to 10-second level. A few cases derived from realistic code examples that causes trouble to the compiler are analyzed in detail, with proposed solutions. This step of \CFA project development is critical to its eventual goal to be used alongside C for large software systems.
     91
    8992\end{abstract}
    9093
    9194\section{Introduction}
     95
     96\CFA language, developed by the Programming Language Group at University of Waterloo, has a long history, with the first proof-of-concept compiler built in 2003 by Richard Bilson~\cite{Bilson03}. Many new features are added to the language over time, but the core of \CFA, parametric functions introduced by the @forall@ clause (hence the name of the language), with the type system supporting parametric overloading, remains mostly unchanged.
     97
     98The current \CFA reference compiler @cfa-cc@ still includes many parts taken directly from the original Bilson's implementation, and serves as a starting point for the enhancement work to the type system. Unfortunately, it does not provide the efficiency required for the language to be used practically: a \CFA source file of approximately 1000 lines of code can take a few minutes to compile. The cause of the problem is that the old compiler used inefficient data structures and algorithms for expression resolution, which involved a lot of copying and redundant work.
     99
     100This paper presents a series of optimizations to the performance-critical parts of the resolver, with a major rework of the data structure used by the compiler, using a functional programming approach to reduce memory complexity. Subsequent improvements are mostly suggested by running the compiler builds with a performance profiler against the \CFA standard library source code and a test suite to find the most underperforming components in the compiler algorithm.
     101
     102The \CFA team endorses a pragmatic philosophy in work that mostly focuses on practical implications of language design and implementation, rather than the theoretical limits. In particular, the compiler is designed to work on production \CFA code efficiently and keep type safety, while sometimes making compromises to expressiveness in extreme corner cases. However, when these corner cases do appear in actual usage, they need to be thoroughly investigated. Analysis presented in this paper, therefore, are conducted on a case-by-case basis. Some of them eventually point to certain weaknesses in the language design and solutions are proposed based on experimental results.
    92103
    93104\section{Completed work}
     
    444455\section{Timing results}
    445456
    446 For the timing results presented here, the \CFA compiler is built with gcc 9.3.0, and tested on a server machine running Ubuntu 20.04, 64GB RAM and 32-core 2.2 GHz CPU, results reported by the time command, and using only 8 cores in parallel such that the time is close to the case with 100% CPU utilization on a single thread.
     457For the timing results presented here, the \CFA compiler is built with gcc 9.3.0, and tested on a server machine running Ubuntu 20.04, 64GB RAM and 32-core 2.2 GHz CPU, results reported by the time command, and using only 8 cores in parallel such that the time is close to the case with 100\% CPU utilization on a single thread.
    447458
    448459On the most recent build, the \CFA standard library (~1.3 MB of source code) compiles in 4 minutes 47 seconds total processor time (single thread equivalent), with the slowest file taking 13 seconds. The test suite (178 test cases, ~2.2MB of source code) completes within 25 minutes total processor time,\footnote{Including a few runtime tests; total time spent in compilation is approximately 21 minutes.} with the slowest file taking 23 seconds. In contrast, the library build on old compiler takes 85 minutes total, 5 minutes for the slowest file. Full test suite takes too long with old compiler build and is therefore not run, but the slowest test cases take approximately 5 minutes. Overall, the most recent build compared to old build in April 2020, before the project started, is consistently faster by a factor of 20.
Note: See TracChangeset for help on using the changeset viewer.